Simple Steps You Can Take To Protect You and Your Family From Identity Theft

Simple Steps You Can Take To Protect You and Your Family From Identity Theft

By Joe Delaney I recently had the chance to hear Frank Abagnale speak and share his story at the 2015 BAM ALLIANCE National Conference. Even if you don’t recall his name, you’ll probably recognize Frank’s story. It was chronicled in Steven Spielberg’s 2002 film “Catch Me If You Can,” starring Leonardo DiCaprio as Abagnale and Tom Hanks as the FBI agent hot on his heels. The movie, which I had watched previously, chronicles Abagnale’s life on the run impersonating various professionals (the short list includes Pan Am airline pilot, doctor and attorney) and cashing bogus checks along the way. The movie ends at the point in his criminal career where he agrees to work with the FBI in exchange for commuting his sentence. Abagnale is now one of the world’s most respected authorities on forgery, embezzlement and document security. He has been associated with the FBI for more than 35 years, and has advised and consulted with hundreds of financial institutions, corporations and government agencies around the world. So, when he shared some simple tips on how to protect yourself from identity theft, I perked up and listened. Here are the top 10 identity and/or credit protection strategies that I picked up from his extremely instructive talk: 1. Credit Cards – Credit cards often come with fraud protection, so why not risk the credit card company’s money instead of your own? Consider using a credit card, not a debit card, for online and other purchases. Although Abagnale did not mention this, his recommendation assumes you are always diligent about paying off your monthly balance. Never, ever carry a credit balance. 2....
There Is Only One Person Who Knows Where the Market Is Going

There Is Only One Person Who Knows Where the Market Is Going

By: Larry Swedroe Recently, I gave a seminar entitled “The Winning Investment Strategy.” The talk focused on assembling a globally diversified portfolio of passively managed funds (such as index funds and ETFs) tailored to an individual’s ability, willingness and need to take market risk. I also discussed the importance of integrating a well-constructed investment plan into a comprehensive estate, tax and risk management (insurance of all types) plan. And finally, I discussed the need for maintaining the discipline required to ignore all market and economic forecasts made in the financial media and by Wall Street, because all-to-often they lead investors to abandon their long-term plans. To continue reading, click here.   By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of the BAM ALLIANCE. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. © 2016, The BAM...
Dealing With an Investing Blind Spot

Dealing With an Investing Blind Spot

By: Carl Richards Psst. Excuse me. I’ve got a secret. I feel like I should be talking really quietly right now, but first I need to warn you. This secret is going to seem incredibly obvious. You may even wonder why I’m going to tell you about it at all. The secret comes in two parts: 1. We all have blind spots. 2. By definition, we can’t see them. See what I mean about being obvious? They’re called blind spots for a reason, because you can’t see them. But here’s the real tragedy: We’re often totally uncoachable when it comes to dealing with this secret. To continue reading click...
Money Steps to Take Before Your 40th Birthday

Money Steps to Take Before Your 40th Birthday

By: Kimberly Palmer As we get older, our money responsibilities often increase: As our 30s progress, we might take on a mortgage, support more dependent family members or manage more money in our retirement accounts. To help you navigate these financial milestones, here are 11 financial steps to consider taking before the decade is over: Create a solid emergency savings fund. Creating an emergency savings fund can prevent you from relying on a credit card and going into debtwhen unexpected costs strike, says “Today” show financial editor Jean Chatzky. “You’ve got to watch it with the debt,” she warns, adding that half of Americans lack emergency funds. “Lack of savings and debt go hand in hand … an emergency cushion is insurance against debt,” she says. To continue reading, please click here.   By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of the BAM ALLIANCE. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. © 2016, The BAM...
Setting Aside Shame and Blame in Financial Decisions

Setting Aside Shame and Blame in Financial Decisions

By: Carl Richards I’m a huge advocate of the “no shame, no blame” rule when it comes to money. But I think there’s some confusion about how the rule works. It’s not that you won’t feel guilt. It’s also not about avoiding responsibility. Instead, it’s about recognizing the zero-sum game of relying on shame and blame to make better money decisions. Brené Brown, perhaps best known for her TEDx Houston talk on “The Power of Vulnerability” (she also dida great one on shame), has spent more than a decade studying vulnerability, courage, shame and worthiness. Through her work, she has found that shame isn’t a very effective tool for changing behavior. For real change, we need to reframe the conversation by understanding the role of guilt and encouraging people to take responsibility. During a recent conversation between Dr. Brown and Tim Ferriss, it became clear to me that the “no shame, no blame” rule may be one of the most important rules we need to follow when it comes to personal finance. The level of importance grows when it involves a spouse or partner. To continue reading, please click here. By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may...
Page 1 of 3123