Level: Can A Budgeting App Change The Way We Bank?

Level: Can A Budgeting App Change The Way We Bank?

By: Tim Maurer “Level is dedicated to rewriting the financial rulebook to create a secure future for the next generation.” That’s budgeting app Level Money’s stated mission, which can be found on their website’s “About Us” page. But even as lofty as that objective sounds, co-founder and CEO Jake Fuentes says the company’s sights are set even higher. “Basic everyday money management,” he suggests, could be “the first step toward changing—or creating—the next generation’s banking structure.” An app that hopes to change the way the next generation banks? I’m listening.  To continue reading, please click...
Crucial Conversations Before Your Child Heads to College

Crucial Conversations Before Your Child Heads to College

By: Kathleen Longo With my oldest daughter now graduated from high school, the summer has been busy with various celebrations, planning for freshman orientation and preparing long lists of supplies necessary for life in a college dorm room. It has also presented an opportunity to talk with her about the family finances and set expectations for life beyond high school. Here are some key topics I’ve discussed with my daughter, and which may be useful in your own conversations with college-bound children: Set Expectations State your expectations around college funding. If you have saved enough money to cover four years of college tuition, then communicate this fact (along with your expectation that your child complete his or her degree in four years or the fifth year is their responsibility to pay for). Whether or not your incoming freshman has already decided on a career path, the first years in college offer an opportunity to take the required core classes as well as explore areas of interest.  To continue reading, please click here.   By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of the BAM ALLIANCE. This article is for general information only and...
Say ‘I Do’ to Love and Money: Three Smart Money Moves for Newlyweds

Say ‘I Do’ to Love and Money: Three Smart Money Moves for Newlyweds

By: Manisha Thakor Financial compatibility is right up there with having a sense of humor as a top trait that couples look for in a partner, according a new poll on “Love and Money.”But there can be some major differences in how partners manage money that can have serious ramifications in a relationship, and that could impact your own financial security. For many newlyweds, tying the knot can often be complicated when it comes to finances. Make sure you have a talk—at least one a month—with your spouse about your money and your future so you can live happily ever after. Newlyweds can begin building a great foundation by talking about their financial dreams so they can figure out how to reach them together. Some key questions include: Are you a saver or spender? Do you have money woes that keep you up at night?  To continue reading, please click here.   By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of the BAM ALLIANCE. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. © 2016, The BAM...
Avoid The Recency Pitfall

Avoid The Recency Pitfall

By: Larry Swedroe Last year, U.S. real estate investment trusts (REITs) were the best-performing equity asset class. In addition, U.S. stocks far outperformed international stocks. Unfortunately, historical evidence demonstrates that individual investors tend to be performance chasers. They watch the markets, then buy yesterday’s winners (after the great performance) and sell yesterday’s losers (after the loss has already been incurred). Thus, I wasn’t surprised at the amount of time I spent in 2014, and in early 2015, trying to convince investors to avoid the mistake I refer to as “recency.” Recency is the tendency to extrapolate recent returns far into the future, which causes investors to buy high and sell low. That’s not exactly a recipe for investment success.  To continue reading, please click here.   By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of the BAM ALLIANCE. This article is for general information only and is not intended to serve as specific financial, accounting or tax advice. © 2016, The BAM...
Who Will Raise Your Kids If You Can’t?

Who Will Raise Your Kids If You Can’t?

By: Michael J. Evans Who will raise my kids if I can’t? This is a huge and unthinkable question. So it’s no wonder that I frequently hear a multitude of excuses from family, friends and clients – all the parents of young children – who have not yet set up their essential estate plans. Often, the hurdle isn’t finding the right lawyer, or spending the money to get it done. It’s making that gut-wrenching decision about who to designate as the guardians of your minor children in your stead. As unpleasant as the task may be, the consequences of postponing it are worse. In the absence of carefully prepared estate-planning documents with proper designation directions, you’re effectively leaving it up to a judge to decide what is in the best interest of your children, without your input. If you’re facing this sort of wall in your family’s estate-planning process, the following steps may help you make the necessary leap from best intentions to appropriate action. To continue reading, please click here.   By clicking on any of the links above, you acknowledge that they are solely for your convenience, and do not necessarily imply any affiliations, sponsorships, endorsements or representations whatsoever by us regarding third-party Web sites. We are not responsible for the content, availability or privacy policies of these sites, and shall not be responsible or liable for any information, opinions, advice, products or services available on or through them. The opinions expressed by featured authors are their own and may not accurately reflect those of the BAM ALLIANCE. This article is for general information only and is...
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